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. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
it will be sold for a plot of property on the beach. >> did we learn enough from katrina? it seems that people did evacuate, but we didn't have the same problems post-katrina that we did last time in terms of people getting to safety ahead of the storm. from your observation, do you think that's accurate? >> i think all of our professional forecasters -- boy, did they get the right. a week out, they knew this tropical system was going to explode, the way it did take this left hook into new jersey. it has been katrina-esque. the man holding the camera, dwyane scott, was with me in new orleans overnight for that storm. for weeks thereafter, we've been talking about it nonstop today. we may have to rethink some of our shoreline rules and definitions. we've got governors of three states, christie, malloy, cuomo, those three states are talking about a new shoreline and maybe a new normal. maybe we need our folks at the weather channel to tell us, is this a 200-year storm or the start of 200 years worth of storms like this. >> is there a spirit of rebuilding here? do you hear frit the locals? have you b
business bureau. fraud was so rampant in the wake of hurricane katrina in 2005 the government created a disaster fraud team which is said to have prosecuted nearly 1,500 people involved with running scams related to katrina and rita. meanwhile, countless americans are opening their wallets to victims of the superstorm. about $11.4 million so far has been donated to the red cross, two days after the storm. that's more than the $8 million donated after hurricane isaac. a music telethon dedicated to sandy and led by bruce springsteen, bon jovi and billy joel will air on nbc tonight. climate change failed to become a major headline story in the presidential election... until now. in the aftermath of hurricane sandy, new york mayor michael bloomberg noted the summer drought, melting ice caps and rising temputures as reasons to take action on climate change. then on thursday in a stunning move, bloomberg endorsed president obama, citing his record on climate change issues such as raising fuel emissions standards. meanwhile, gop vice presidential candidate paul ryan suggests taking another
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
katrina. once they finish their work they are expected to be sent north to help with new jersey and new york. all of us are looking at trees differently. we had a contractor killed when a tree fell on him on homewood avenue. the victim died at scene. firefighters said the man was part of the crew contracted to clean up trees in the area. >>> in towson they were working to remove a tree that came down on this house. with all the rain that we have seen from sandy, the tree service got the truck stuck and had to deeing that out. >> sandy's down -- winds down trees. at one point more than 5 roads were closed -- 50 roads were closed. >>> let's go to millers island. testify that been through storms. people said isabelle was the worst storm for them. with sandy they were pleased with how the storm came back. >> i thought the power would be out by 3:00 in the afternoon. it -- it came back on at 3:30 in the morning. if they had said a few days, i would have been happy with that. >> millers island did see damage. >>> drivers had to be rerouted on york road in cockeysville. it exposed a hole in th
remains filled with water and must be pumped out. >> and massive pumps used in hurricane katrina have begun to drain the opportunity el there. kennedy airport will reopen on a restricted basis today but la guardia is still under power and newark doesn't even have power. amtrak could have limited service today. as for the subways, engineers will have to inspect the 600 miles of track once the water is pumped out of there. >>> in sports, the wizards open the regular season with john wall on the bench nursing an injury. the cavs would jump to a 16- point lead. they drop the opener, 94-846789 the home opener is saturday night against the celtics. there goes your 82-0 start for the wizards. >> okay. we still have plenty ahead. >> fox 5 morning news at 4:30 starts now. happy wednesday. it is october 31st. a live look outside right now at the washington monument as people try to recover and get back to some sense of normalcy after what we've been through in the last couple of days with hurricane sandy. i'm sarah simmons. >> i'm wisdom martin. welcome to fox 5 morning news. the federal govern
here. the same group that went to the gulf coast following hurricane katrina. the navy is bringing in pumps that they normally use on ships. i want it draw attention to the building behind me. it is staten island ferry entrance. currently all services are suspended indefinitely. the police tape is up by the battery park underpass. because as you can see 50 feet of water is still there. limited subway service began before 6:00 today. mta says 5.5 million people daily right on their subways. they also say any day that their trains are not running it costs them $18 million in revenue. traffic has been a mess throughout the city because of lack of people not being able to use public transportation and road closures. they're making three occupants or more are in each vehicle if they're going over the four east river bridges. they won't get a ticket but they won't let people through if they don't have three people in there. also the area around where the crane collapsed in midtown is still frozen. we heard from the mayor bloomberg and he is saying that that is going to be weekend before
's happening now reminds him of katrina. gary, tell me why you believe that. >> reporter: piers, this is a city of 50,000 people right across the hudson river in new york city. yes, it does remind me of katrina because behind us we have 50% of hoboken flooded and there are, according to the mayor, thousands of people in their apartments and homes who can't get out right now. so we actually went on a front loader with the mayor, they're using front loaders to rescue people. they're trying to prioritize the rescues. what's different about this than new orleans, what we saw in katrina in 2005 when we went down streets in boats, is that there are no casualties. that's the good news. but they're still not 100% sure. people can't leave their homes, not only because the water's deep but because there's live power lines in the water. so as we're going down the street in this front-loader we see people waving from their windows, children, men, women. and most of them seem to have smiles on their faces because they've seen the water recede. in new orleans the water kept getting higher. this water is rece
in a time of disaster. quite different from now democrats treated president bush after katrina. this from james. fitting it tacks an act of god to finally spotlight romney's weaknesses. thank you for your responses and joining me today. "cnn newsroom" continues right now with ashleigh banfield. >> thank you so much. it's 11:00 on the east coast. 8:00 a.m. on the west coast. recovery is a word you are going to be hearing a lot of in the next few days. the word normalcy, not so much. in the wake of superstorm sandy, normal life is a far off dream for so many millions in the northeast corridor and points west. worst of all, a still growing toll of lives lost. at least 40 in the u.s. one so far in canada. more than 6 million homes and businesses still don't have electricity but that is a big improvement from yesterday. and while floods and surges with some exceptions have gone down, that just makes the devastation all the more apparent. you are looking at point pleasant beach halfway between new york and atlantic city on the new jersey shore. president obama visiting these scenes this afterno
of gasoline as opposed to the producer, and some other hurricanes like katrina and irene before, they've hit an area that has been a big producer of oil, whereas really, in the northeast, they are the consumers of all of that gasoline, and so demand has dropped, but the supply hasn't really dropped as much. > > so the demand is dropping, especially as people are stuck home and not going to offices for instance. > > right. flights are canceled, and people are not driving around as you said, so the demand there has dropped, and that, interestingly enough, has pushed some prices in the southeast region down even further because that oil that usually would have gone to the northeast has dropped off a little bit. > > so much of this boils down to what's going on with the refineries. so what do you anticipate there? you know, we think that this is going to be just a temporary shutdown in the northeast region, and that, as i said earlier, we are going to continue to see prices continue to drop, and demand will come back up after the hurricane is through. > > quick predictions now: where do you see
reinforce or under d undermine that narrative. in the case of george w. bush in 2006 with hurricane katrina, he campaigned as basically a compassionate conservative. but his actions during the whole katrina mess proved that he was otherwise. >> because you have that lasting image of president bush and when he said that thing about his fema director, way to go, brownie, or whatever he said. that sticks in people's minds to this day. >> right. that would be a defining sound bite of his entire presidency. granted, it's unfair, but that's what sticks in people's minds. >> in your mind, has president obama made the right move, wrong move? what do you think? >> i think he has made the appropriate move here. he hasn't been too over. that's the key here. you can't be overtly political in how you respond to these kinds of disasters. he obviously will accrue some benefits because he's acting aas commanders in chief are supposed to act and help people on a broad basis. as the remarks of governor christie of new jersey proved, this is a -- he gets bipartisan support out of this disaster. that has to he
is now being called new jersey and new york's katrina. >> it's big deal. >> thanks christine. >>> here's a look at the latest outage numbers in our area -- >>> this morning, police continue to investigate a fatal pedestrian accident in jermantown. sky 9 was over the scene yesterday when a 15-year-old was killed on jermantown road at wisteria drive. the victim has been identified as christina morris-ward. she was a tenth grader at seneca valley high school and he was walking to -- she was walking to school. julie wolf excuse me is live on the scene in jermantown and she has more on where things are moving forward today. julie, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you mike, we are here less than a half a mile from seneca value legal high school. this is where christina morris- ward was trying to cross the road and make it here on the way to school when she was hit and killed. montgomery county police tell me they are still reconstructing the accident. here at the scene yesterday, they told me that the driver did stop to help after the accident. and he was the one with the green lig
sense as well? >> katrina? yes. i know how those people in katrina feel. i really do. my heart went out to them. but until you go through something like this, you cannot understand the magnitude of this. my friends have come to help me. they said, michelle, we looked at your yard because we have all the stuff in the yard. they said, michelle, if we didn't see this with our own eyes, we would never believe it. >> and it's hard to know when power will be restored. mayor bloomberg said the ferry service will resume in the next day or so. he says full service by saturday, the ferry from staten island over to manhattan, new york. but who knows what's going to happen. >> i don't know. >> our heart goes out to you and your family. >> thank you so much. i'm a big fan of yours, wolf. it's a pleasure to speak with you. you know, i have to put it in perspective. we have our lives and i have my children. and, you know, it's just stuff like my kids say. but when i find my son's baby book, it rips at your heart strings. but i'm grateful that we're here. >> yeah. and i like your attitude. you got to t
katrina and 9/11. this is actually a company that charles has talked about before. take a look at how the dollar is faring today. ♪ from local communities to local businesses. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. >> 22 minutes past the hour. i am jamie colby with your fox news minute. some subways are rolling again. none of them are going into lower manhattan which is still without power. long lines to get a shuttle bus into the city. they carry more than 5 million people a day. the commuter railroads are providing service. in the meantime, all fares are waived through midnight tomorrow night. all three new york airports are back in service. even on a limited basis. laguardia was the last to come back online due to flooding. everyone should confirm flights before heading to the airport. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail. after three days focusing on the federal response to the storm, the president w
, there is debris everywhere but there isn't just devastation. this is an katrina that watch everything away. these buildings still exist. there is a heck of a clean up here to do but this can come back. a little worse down the beach in seaside heights and atlantic city but it will come back but look. look at this debris. junk everywhere. this is going to take a while. this is the roof of the tiki bar which is 300 yards up the beach. this was the roof of it and that is deposited here. i leave you with this shot at the atlantic ocean. it occurred to me today that as i look out there it is almost like nothing happened. the ocean is saying i was upset but i am calm now. i may not stay calm forever but you are good for while. connell: that pictures of beautiful and to come back to the isolation is jarring. what stood out to you today? today is the first day you had a chance to walk around the. >> exactly. the first sunny day. the first real nice day. you hit it exactly right. the contrast in the devastation and the beauty. this is typically what we see after hurricane. took a couple extra days b
just a few moments ago that this is similar to what we saw during katrina. >> that's right. hard to grasp. >> homes on fire. >> and then you've got homes on fire. you saw it in new orleans with katrina. these just spontaneous explosions involving homes. and unfortunately, you've got all this water, and firefighters and first responders can't get that water -- >> yeah. to use it to put -- >> to put on the fire. it's a dangerous situation for them. and this is exactly what the mayor was trying to warn people about. don't put your first responders in danger. but this is the situation here. we're going to have much more of our continuing coverage of this superstorm. next. cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? 100% new. 100% mmm... wow, that is mmm... it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calori
know, put katrina at one end. that was $100 billion. put irene at another end. that was a $13 billion event. i've seen 30 to 50. it feels, especially after you see that aerial video of what happens on the shores of new jersey, like it may be more along the 30 to 50 range when you talk about total property damage and you talk also about lost business activity. it was down in wall street. >> especially at a time when the economy was -- there was a sense it was starting to slow down again. we haven't had the strongest economy anyway. are we more vulnerable to this? >> i don't want to say there's an up side to this, but you could have a situation where some of the construction and some of the rebuilding happens in the same quarter where you had the business loss, so you have a really net no change to gdp. if there are major construction projects undertaken -- for example, let's say they decide the biggest financial center in the world should not be a foot over sea level, that's a major investment that could have a positive back on gdp. >> that's a great point, steve. as far as the idea th
health there. you and i have talked a lot about hospitals in the wake of katrina. why do people put the power in the basement? it seems to me the first thing that's going to go in a flood or any kind of, not even a major a storm, but a minor storm, is your basement's going to flood. >> this has been a bit of a technological whack-a-mole here, because we realized after katrina, and even after the blackout of 2003, we had to do something about backup generators in hospital. and so we moved the generators upstairs, but left the fuel pumps down in the basement. so we fixed the initial problem and have a secondary that no one seems to have thought about. >> okay, is that just complete stupidity, or is that, listen, it's financially expensive and people make the gamble, we're not going to invest the money and hope for the best. >> i think in this case, it was not paying attention to all of the details. i think people were well meaning. i don't think there was any sort of gross negligence here, except that somebody forgot an essential detail, in a situation that requires extraordinarily ex
spiriva. sxwrirchlgts we talk about katrina. there is the long island express as well that was hit in the middle east. it claimed hundreds and hundreds of lives. the death toll was so high. there was hardly any warning or preparation for that matter. well, in the wake of this week's superstorm time magazine is exploring ways to protect people and property from these monster hurricanes. brian joins us live from new york. brooen, it's great to see you. first of all, very compelling articles here. i want to start off by talking about the power grid. you've got millions of folks along the east coast still without power. now they are freezing. we're going to talk about the real cold temperatures coming up over the weekend. how do we focus on the power system to make it more resilient, stronger? >> well, one thing you can do is to look actually at buried power lines. 18% of distribution lines in the u.s. are actually underground. of course, if they're above ground, then they're vulnerable to being knocked down by trees, which is what's happened in all kinds of storms, including a big one
superstorm sandy could be among the most expensive in united states history. hurricane katrina cleanup and recovery cost merely 106 billion dollars, -- cost nearly 106 billion dollars. katie marzullo, abc7 news. >> the need is great and to help the people affected by sandy, you can text the words red cross to 90999 to donate $10 or call 1-800-red cross. or go to abc7news.com for a link to the red across website. >>> teenager accused of stealing a celebrity chef's lamborghini and shooting at two people set to race rearraignment today. a judge ruled two weeks ago there is enough evidence against 18-year-old max wade and ordered him to tan trial on various charges. police say wade stole guy fieri's lamborghini last year to impress a girl she rejected him wade is accused shooting at a car she was in with her boyfriend. >>> san leandro's ban on styrofoam takes effect today. restaurants must use compostable -- [ unintelligible ] businesses that don't comply will be given one warning. officials say they adopted the ordinance last year to protect the city's natural environment. san leandro joi
. >> it was biggest in its size, not its strength. katrina was a stronger hurricane. a lot of them have been stronger storms but not as big. either way, very destructive. we are not selling sandy short at this hour. >> yeah, let's not do this. >> very respectful. good news is conditions are getting better around here. we'll be looking at -- it won't be a bright sunny day but maybe a peek or two of sunshine. we are getting the rain and wind out of here so things will calm down. kids want to go trick or treating later. it will be cool but it shouldn't be raining. >> i think my first graphic is halloween. >> this is all good news considering the last couple of days. >> yeah, this is fantastic. i want to encourage you nobody to come to my neighborhood because we don't have power because that would be pretty scary for the kids. >> i'm a sure they won't be there. >> ghostly clouds, a creepy chill, upper 40s. we should be dry in time for the trick or treaters. during the afternoon, you might catch a little sunshine but with temperatures in the 50s but we'll be falling back into the 40s here by 6:00, 7:00 t
're guaranteeing they will be in effect of any need them. we saw that in connection with katrina and normans, and how poorly fema performed. i think it is a striking contrast that now you have a very vociferous republicann governor of new jersey who is saying, fema was there right away and was released on its game. so it is possible for the government to perform poorly impossible for them to perform well. i think the political drama was all played out in new jersey was well worth considering. >> paul barrett, i want to move to the issue of gun control. mayor bloomberg also raise the issue of and control and why he is supporting president obama. he said 2008, obama ran as a pragmatic but-let me see. he ran as a pragmatic problem solver but as president he devoted little time and effort to developing a system in a coalition of centrist, which doomed of repress on illegal guns, tax reform, job creation and deficit reduction. in fact, interestingly, he is somewhat critical of president obama on gun-control and you are very well positioned to talk about this issue, as your last book is called "gl
think the good news unlike katrina, this will be more of a localized event. we lost billion two million barrels a day of refining capacity along the east coast. but, that's going to be offset right now but a drop in demand, a little bit more than that. so the good news is philadelphia, the largest refinery, that is the old sunoco facility, looks like minimal damage there it produces about a third of all refined products along the east coast. so that is looking pretty good but as you mentioned a couple others have storm damage and they have some flooding. it will be about a week before we know for sure. melissa: what about the drop in demand? you might read that as good news because we're not fighting over that supply. that is taking something out of the economy. and a lot of people filled up right before the storm started, so there's kind of a decline in demand as a result of that as well. >> right. melissa: is there an economic impact to the fact that people aren't driving? >> well there is. there is an economic impact. i mean this storm's economic impact will be measured in more ways
was chris back in the bush years when hurricane katrina happened? apparently, that has no impact on natural thing. it is all the president's fault back then and now it is not. >> no, how you respond to it that determines whether it is the president's fault. melissa: we've got to go. >> we'll see about that. thanks. melissa: thanks to both for coming on. appreciate your time. refusing to close for superstorm sandy has some businesses thriving. how serving up clients has never paid so well for the owner of one manhattan restaurant. we had to find a silver lining. at the end of the day it is all about money. ♪ follow the wings. melissa: as sandy was ripping across new york city earlier this week most people were hunkered down, hiding out at home until it was over. most people that is but not everyone. a restaurant in manhattan chose to brave the storm and stayed open throughout the entire thing. since they were one of the only places to do so they actually made a killing. leave it to new yorkers to bank on a disaster and make it work. sirio's owner joins me now. thanks for coming on. we've b
but let's remember, president bush was criticized by both parties when he flew over katrina and didn't stop. so, i think today's show, melissa, would have been if president obama didn't offer to come here, we would be talking about why the president dissed new york, why he didn't offer to go there while he has the state wrapped up politically and doing this for political reasons. he offered to go. the mayor said, hey, we have a lot going on and we're busy and declined that. i think the mayor made a mistake. anytime a president offers to come visit on the ground i think you should take that. that is mayor bloomberg's choice. we disagree on what he did but i understand why he did it. melissa: thank goodness said the little part at the end because all of sudden you weren't on to disagree but i won you over before we start the argument, i don't put beyond the realm of possibility. you would have accepted it if you were in new york city? do you have a monitor near you? do you happen to see, can you put up the traffic again? did you happen to see what is going on? there it is. oh. >> this
hurricane katrina days, used to run fema when katrina happened. he said this about what the president is doing. my guess is that he wants to gt ahead of it, he doesn't want to be accused of not getting on top of it, paying attention to it or playing politics in the middle of it. he went on to say thabout benghazi. what do you make of this? >> it's interesting coming from someone who has an abysmal record on handling emergencies. where i'm from, my family was evacuated, are happy that the president jumped in and moved quickly in response to this storm. we don't take too much credence from somebody with a record like mr. brown. >> thank you for your time. >> thank you. >> interesting question to have about fema. reporters throwing questions at governor romney yesterday. they were asking him a number of times -- he wouldn't state -- do you think this is problematic for the governor? >> i don't think so at all. first of all, let me just respond to jen. she just blew off the criticism about benghazi. you listen to her saying in a crisis the president hunkered down in the white house, gett
katrina which, you know, so many people blamed the response of fema and so forth on george w. bush. >> are well, it was kind of a benign neglect at that point in time. the president, as you may recall, flew over it initially. he had an idiot running the fema who's still popping off, mr. brown. i think fema is absolutely an agency on the ground here doing wonderful things. the end of the day the one entity of the federal government that works better than anybody else is the military, and sooner or later we're going to have to put a general in the charge as we did katrina, let them get all the stuff done. they have the equipment, the resources, the manpower, and we've got a big problem ahead. and three or four days from now this is going to continue to be a burden for a lot of people's lives, and you're going to need to respond. [inaudible conversations] >> fema, this fema under obama has been getting great marks all the way around, but they learned a lot from katrina, you know? jon: as the father of an army second lieutenant, i have to agree, the u.s. military does its work very wel
, the west coast. >> that was one of famous of our colleagues years ago, during katrina, we were talking about how many poles had been town and she looked in to the camera and said just know it stay calm, help is on the way. and we all said no one can hear you. they don't have power. it was a very heartfelt sincere help is on the way, but the people that needed it were not in front of the tv set at the time. >> you send out a reminder e-mail is down. >> and then by the time it's back up -- >> isn't it crazy that e-mail is work something. >> you're right, verizon was working. >> coming up, we'll talk to governor markell to check out the damage in delaware. well find out how his state made it through the night. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. governor of getting i
you compare this to other events you've seen? >> let's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at b
does to the economy. >> it does have a big impact, though. because back to katrina for example. that was $75 billion of insured losses. which meant that the economic losses were over $100 billion. so usual talking a very big deal here. companies start to assess how much the business was disrupted. accessibility to their business. the ability of their employees to come to work. you don't start to see contamination issues and environmental issues until later on. but it's unfortunate to say and you asked me a very valid question, it's unfortunate to say that i think this number could be very big. >> the other question is who pays for all of this because the flooding, a lot of this will go to the national flood insurance program. but at some point, who ends up picking up the tab. >> i think mostly the insurance companies, becky. there's three sources of ways to fund catastrophes. you have the national flood insurance program as you mentioned, but that's under fema. fema stands for federal emergency management agency. and that's basically a response mechanism and i think they're doi
resources well. i think government will perform well. this is not going to be katrina. when government performs well, they t re-emphasizes in people's minds that government does matter. >> what's your take on the early voting story? you have a new poll showing governor romney still in the lead and certainly they're tied, 47% each, cwhen you look at eary voting turnout. how much of an impact does this storm have on early voting turnout? >> well, some, but so many people have voted. look at ohio. a third of the voters have will be cast their votes. i think early voting has helped with the democratic base. i think the democratic base has gotten more and more enthusiastic, more and more fired up. you're seeing that with the long lines in places in urban centers which tend to be democratic. i think it's going to be a surprisingly good democratic turn youtd. >> all right. we'll leave it there. governor, good to have you on the program. >>> let's go back to julia boorst boorstin. we have more on the disney/lucas film deal. >> that's right, maria. walt disney is acquiring lucas films for $4.05
, at the height of the storm. i heard about this. we covered katrina so much, and we covered all the horror stories of the patients there. how the generators failed or why is something to look at in days ahead. but for everybody who worked there, as a resident of the city, i want to say thank you. >> you're welcome. it was the whole team. you have to remember that 19 babies that people took one at a time. >> each had that team. incredible. thank you so much. >> you're welcome. >> thank you so much. yeah. makes your heart feel good. another critical story is in its final days from now until tuesday. president obama, mitt romney plan to campaign nonstop in battleground states. today the romney campaign added a new one to the list. is that a sign of confidence or is it a bluff? we'll talk about that. if you think running a restaurant is hard, try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do
it? >> fema responds rather adroitly to -- katrina notwithstanding, to these disasters. i suspect they're going to be quite responsive right now for those who have been displaced, who have lost family members, who don't have homes. i think there will be a rapid response from the federal government. >> i'm just saying, we could use that money in other areas right now. not necessarily the bond buying program. just an observation. >> maria, i got say, i don't know if the bond buying is actually helping. we're seeing a lot of bond buying. i don't know where that money is going to. we see unemployment raising. >> is survey showed pick ups in demand for most classes in lending right now. so it has had a positive effect in a place where it could matter. we have seen in general some of the interest rates that matter go down in the economy, including mortgages. >> and a big uptick in housing. >> maybe not perfect, but it seems to have had an effect. >> do we anticipate the typical pickup in economic activity following a natural disaster of this magnitude here, ron? >> bill, listen, it's go
, reminds me of the hospital stories we heard in katrina and new orleans there must have been patients on ventilators that had to be manually kept alive and getting babies out of the nicu in the dead of night, when the power has gone out. i can't imagine how difficult that was. >> it reminded me very much of my time in new orleans after katrina. the adults, it was interesting, the adults on respirators, they batteries. they were brought down, some of them 15 flights of stairs on respirators with batteries. for some reason the neonatal -- the little newborn babies, their respirators did not have babies. doctors or nurses had to do bagging, where the doctors, the nurse squeezes air right into the baby's lungs so they're walking nine flights down from the nicu, while the whole time squeezing air into the babies' lungs. >> as far as you know, no fatalities. >> as far as we know, all is doing well. some people right now, anderson are asking the question, why didn't they evacuate sooner. i think that's a question that is going to be talked about at nyu for a while now. >> yeah. certainly the
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